Malware Analysis – Lesson 2; Types of malware

It is important for any malware analyst to understand the different categories of malware and how they try to infect our systems in order to better check for indicators of compromise. Malware is categorized and sub categorized based on its behavior, purpose and infection vector. Even beyond this many malware have spawned slight variants, such as Zeus, further providing a need for categorization.

By finding the commonalities between different malware we are able to more easily find malware indicators of compromise that allows us more efficiently identify and isolate malware strains.

Malware Stats

Before we continue it is interesting to note that while total malware is being churned out at an exponential rate, new malware appearing every year has mostly remained static. The primary reason for this is to create new, good malware there is a high level of technical skill required. Many of the threat actors we encounter would not meet this skill level and so rely on purchasing malware or changing existing malware into a new variant.

This is very easy to do and can be as simple as adding padding, changing the portions of the malware that is encrypted, moving functions around or even changing the functions themselves. Each of these steps(and theres more that can be done!) act as a way of tricking antivirus’ into believing the application is different even though the purpose and result of execution is the same. This explosion of variants can easily be seen with the banking Trojan Zeus, which has over 100,000 variants and more appearing every day.

AV-Test has some great statistics on this: https://www.av-test.org/en/statistics/malware/

Malware Classification

Classifying malware by behavior helps us gain an understanding of what the malware’s infection vector is, what its purpose is, how big of a risk it is and how we can defend against it. Knowing these things, and being able to quickly classify malware in this way allows us to more quickly respond. We need to know what malware has done, how the asset was compromised and when to restore it to a known good state.

Later in this post we are going to go through the classifications but until then Aman Hardikar has a nice mind map that gives a good visualization of how classification may be done. His blog may be found here.

The Computer Antivirus Research Organization Naming Scheme

CARO is a naming convention for malware varients that makes new malware names easy to understand, informative and standardized. It was created primarily for AV companies and, while not universally adopted it is used with variations among many vendors.

The naming convention is split as follows:

Type – the classification of malware (eg Trojan)

Platform – The operating system targeted

Family – the broader group of malware the variant belongs to.

Variant Letter – an alpha identifier (aaa, aab, aac etc)

Any additional information – for example if it is part of a modular threat.

If we put these components together we get an informative name. I have included a Microsoft image to help illustrate this below and the MS article can be found here.

MAEC

MAEC is a community developed structure language for encoding and sharing information about malware. It contains information on a malware’s behavior, artifacts or IoC’s, and relationships between malware samples were relevant. Those relationships give MAEC and advantage over relying on simple signatures and hashes as it generates these relationships based on low level functions, code, API calls and more. It can be used to describe malicious behaviors found or observed in malware at a higher level, indicating the vulnerabilities it exploits, behavior like email address harvesting from contact lists or disabling of a security service.

MISP

Where MAEC is a structured language like XML, MISP is an open source system for the management and sharing of IoCs. Its primary features include a centralized searchable data repository, a flexible sharing mechanism based on defined trust groups and semi-anonymized discussion boards.

An IoC is any indicator caused by a malicious action, intrusion or similar. It can be network calls, processes running, registry key creation and more. By having a central database of IOCs we are able to leverage the experience gained from cyber attacks across the world.

ENISA has a pretty cool report that include some info on MAEC and MISP. https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/standards-and-tools-for-exchange-and-processing-of-actionable-information/at_download/fullReport

Malware Types

Gollum’s current opinion of malware

viruses

One of the oldest, and definitely most well known malware are Viruses. They can be identified by the way they copy, or inject. themselves into other programs and files. This allows them to persist on a machine even if the original file is deleted and spread to other devices as the “host” files or programs are distributed. There are a few types of viruses that have been identified, and this feeds into our classification taxonomy discussed earlier. Symantec have a pretty good blog on these which can be found here. There are two attributes specifically that i will talk about here;

File Injectors are how viruses spread and the way they infect a host file. There are 3 types of this. Overwriting Infectors overwrite the host file as needed. Companion Infectors rename themselves as the target file. Parasitic Infectors attach themselves to a host file.

Memory resident virus are discussed under the Boot Sector and Master Boot Record virus sections on Symantec guide and discussed in detail by trend micro here. Memory resident infectors remain in a computers RAM after it has been executed to try to infect target files, programs or media (Like floppy drives! if they still exist… surely some bank somewhere uses them 🙂 ). The way the actually infect that target is the same as the File Injector method.

Close up; Macro Viruses

Macro viruses are less of an issue these days as macros are disabled by default in Microsoft word, and enabling them gives the user a pop-up warning them that the macro is attempting to run. In the past these were a major issue however so lets give a brief run down of them.

Macros a small scripts written in the language of the application it is run on, like Microsoft Word, Excel or Visual Basic. This OS independence means a macro run on a windows system will also run on a Mac OSX. Once executed the macro can run a number of functions, from infecting every document of that type, to changing the document contents or even deleting the contents. Generally Macros are spread via spam emails with “invoices” attached. Given they are still prevalent in your spam folder, for the budding Malware analyst these type of macros can be a good opportunity to analyse what a macro is doing. Just be sure to use a secure environment!

Worms

Worms are malware that replicates itself with little to know interacting by the user. How WannaCry spread throughout the world with the SMBv1 vulnerability EternalBlue is a recent example of this. Other types of worms can use browsers, email and IM’s to spread.

Close up; Mass-mailers

Mass Mailers are the traditional worm type malware. This is spread via tantalizingly designed emails that tempt you to click on them. That invoice you forgot to pay, the secret crush who loves you and more are all examples of how this type of malware encourages you to open it. Its a form of social engineering that fools you into clicking the link in the email or downloading the attachment. Some advanced mass mailers can even turn your computer into an SMTP server, to spread to other hosts; by compromising you address book they can email your contacts.

Other types

Other types of Worms include File Sharing worms, which rely on users downloading and running the applications, commonly seen in torrents. Who can resist that randomly uploaded movie on the pirate bay? You have been dying to see it, and anyway who has the cash to pay for it?

Internet worms would be WannaCry. These worms use vulnerabilities to spread across networks.

Instant Messaging worms used to be common and would take over the old IM clients (remember MSN Messenger?) and message all your contacts trying to get them to download the worm themselves.

Trojans

Trojan malware comes from the old Greek epic The Iliad (and the Brad Pitt movie Troy), in that myth that Greece was laying siege to a city, Troy. After a long stalemate they had soldiers hid inside a giant, hollow wooden horse that they pretended was a gift and tricked the defending Trojans into bringing the horse inside to one of the temples. When night fell the soldiers snuck out and opened the gates to the city! I recommend you read the poem itself as its really cool! 🙂

Trojan malware is malware that pretends to be a legitimate application but does something malicious. They do not replicate and tend to have a purpose that benefits from it evading detection, like operating as a backdoor. In many cases the Trojan program’s legitimate “cover” is fully functioning so that the victim will not remove it.

Close up; Bankers

Banker Trojans are designed to steal sensitive user information, like credit card details, credentials and other high value data. We spoke about Zeus before and this is an example of a banker Trojan. It acquires the data and then forwards it on to a Command and Control server, which receives and stores the data to be accessed by the malware author. I wonder if this outbound traffic could be used to detect it.

Close up; Keyloggers

Keyloggers continuously monitor and record keystroke. Usually storing them in a file or exfiltrating them to a command and control server, like with the Bankers. In some cases the keylogger with try to identify specific information by monitoring for “trigger” events; like visiting specific websites to try and capture the credentials. This logging behavior is also seen in bankers.

Close up; Backdoors

Backdoors are an great persistence tool for an attacker. The Trojan operating as a legitimate application opens a port on the server and listens for a connection. The attacker can then connect to your asset through the Trojan. In less targeted attacks the malware may compromise your system and setup a backdoor for the attacker, or their command and control server, to send commands. This outcome of this can be harvesting sensitive data, using your asset as a pivot point to traverse the network or using your asset as a “Zombie” in a botnet.

Rootkits

Rootkits are more scary than what we have talked about so far. Rootkits are not necessarily malware in and of itself, but is a collection of techniques and tools coded into malware allowing for privilege escalation. The aim of the rootkit is to fully compromise the system, conceal its presence and offer persistence. The escalated privilege can be gained by direct attack, using previously acquired log in credentials among other methods. These are difficult to find due to the elevated access it has.

Scareware

Scareware is any malicious application that uses social engineering to scare a user into buying unwanted software. Be giving a sense of urgency (“BUY NOW BEFORE ITS GONE!!!”) and intimidation (“YOUR LAPTOP HAS BEEN HACKED, BUY THIS TO FIX IT!”) the victim may pay the demand. This can come in the form of dodgy antivirus’s but can also be seen in other threats, the most prominent being ransomware. The Scareware portion of ransomware tends to be the countdown timer before “Your files are gone forever”

Adware

Adware can take many forms but the purpose is the same, to show you lots of advertisements. In the past the result of this was to see brightly colored and invasive banner advertisements and pop-up advertisements during regular browsing. As this would generally cause frustration from users(and subsequent adware removals) modern adware tends to try to be more subtle for persistence. Even more they will monitor what you do and create user profiles to then sell to third parties. Scary!

Spam

Spam is an incredibly common function of malware. Brian Krebs  wrote a great book on investigating primarily Russian spammers and found it was a multi-million euro business. In 2014 it was estimated over 90% of emails are spam. That is trillions of emails per year dedicate to this wasteful activity. Spam primarily uses email but can also use blogs, IM’s, advertisements and SMS. Its free for the spam artist and the occasional successes mean its unlikely to subside anytime soon. Beyond the usual risks this also concerns companies as they are responsible for protecting their employees from the kind of abuse spam can entail.

Infection vectors

This portion of our lesson is going to discuss how malware attempts to infect a system. There is the standard technical aspect of how the infection vector enables the malware to infect a system that we need to note, put the vector can also be social engineering. The ways malware authors leverage social engineering to get people to install malware was discussed already but here they are again;

  • Coming from a trusted source, like a worm from a friend saying I love you.
  • Having a sense of urgency or importance, such as having to “INSTALL THIS NOW BEFORE ITS TOO LATE”
  • Arousing interest of the victim, like the friend saying i love you but also offering an interesting service the victim has need of.

Email

Email far exceeds any other vector in terms of speed and coverage by which the malware can spread. Anyone with an email account can be a target of this and this makes extensive use of the social engineering techniques mentioned previously. ILOVEYOU was one of the earliest examples of this attack but macros and viruses embedded in documents distributed by spam campaigns are all still common.

Social networking

Social networking is a great platform for attackers to use due to its extensive reach. Attackers use social networks as a way to enter the lives of victims and provide them with links to malicious sites or malicious files to download. The attacker can also add friends of friends to extend its reach. Generally people accept friend requests if there are mutual connections more often than if there are no mutual friends. Making use of email and password lists that are readily available they can gain access to compromised existing accounts or just create their own.

Setting up their own pages can also be used to spread malware. When a user likes this page they receive updates directly to their news-feed, eliminating the need for a friend request.

Portable Media

Many organisations now a days block the USB ports on their assets and this is for a good reason. Having malware stored on a USB that automatically runs is a real risk facing us today and it can have big consequences. A recent example of this is the 2014 STUXNET attack, where the Israeli intelligence services MOSSAD left USB keys outside of an Iranian Nuclear plant. These USB keys had malware on them and when an unwitting scientist plugged one of them into his workstation the Malware slowly worked its way through the system until it found the Centrifuge SCADA systems. It then executed its main function of causing extensive damage. A lot has been written on this attack and it makes for interesting reading; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet

While STUXNET was a highly targeted attack, portable media can also be used for opportunistic attacks.

URL Links

URL links are a special kind of infection vector as they are usually spread through other infection vectors e.g. social networks, IMs, email etc. Examples of this vector can include link-shortening services and misspelled legitimate domain names. These URLs lead to fake websites that look legitimate (or could even have XSS scripts in the case of URL shorteners). This tricks the user into carrying out their tasks as normal not knowing that the attacker is recording their interaction with the fake website. This includes collecting any credentials used. Many banks have started enforcing Multi-Factor Authentication to mitigate the risks from this(as well as other attacks like Phishing).

File Sharing

The pirate bay and other file sharing websites have long been host to many types of malware. Users tend not to investigate what they download opening themselves up to compromise.

Soundwaves

A good blog on how this vector is used can be found here: https://blog.systoolsgroup.com/malware-through-soundwaves/

Bluetooth

Think BlueBourne; A good blog on how this vector is used can be found here: https://www.extremetech.com/mobile/255752-new-blueborne-bluetooth-malware-affects-billions-devices-requires-no-pairing

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